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About HKJR

 

Hong Kong Journal of Radiology (HKJR) is the official peer-reviewed academic journal of the Hong Kong College of Radiologists. HKJR is published online quarterly by Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. HKJR is a continuation of the Journal of the Hong Kong College of Radiologists.

 

HKJR publishes papers on all aspects of diagnostic imaging, clinical oncology, and nuclear medicine, including original research articles, review articles, perspectives, pictorial essays, case reports, brief communications, editorials, and letters to the Editor. Papers on radiological protection, quality assurance, audit in radiology, and matters related to radiological training or education are also included.

 

The 2022 Journal Impact Factor for the HKJR is 0.2 (Clarivate, 2023).

 

FREE full text of ALL issues is available.

Additional materials may be made free at the Editorial Board's discretion.

 

 

Latest Articles

 

Articles are released before they are included in a journal issue. These articles are fully citable and come with a DOI, enabling the most recent research to be accessed promptly.

 

View Latest Articles

 

 

Current Issue

 

Volume 26 Number 4, December 2023

 

 

FULL TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Highlights of this issue

 

Effects of Different Liver Diseases on Metabolic Reference in 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography
Treatment Outcomes and Toxicities of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Oligoprogressive Metastatic Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer
Breast Ductography: A Hidden Diagnostic Gem for Patients with Abnormal Nipple Discharge

About the Cover Images

In the article “Effects of Different Liver Diseases on Metabolic Reference in 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography”. The 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography axial image shows a patient suffering from polycystic liver disease (arrows). In the article “Mimics of Pituitary and Pineal Germ Cell Tumours on Imaging: A Pictorial Essay”. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sagittal image shows a glial cell tumour at the suprasellar retrochiasmatic region (arrow).